Non-English entries at IF Comp

From IFWiki
Jump to: navigation, search

Browse The Annual IF Competition by year:

Or by platform:

Or by other features:

See also:


This page attempts to give an overview of the non-English games entered in the Annual IF Comp.

  • Shattered Memory (Andrés Viedma Peláez; 2001; Z-code).
    This game was an English translation of the Spanish game Olvido Mortal by the same author. Unfortunately, because the game had been previously released in 2000, albeit in Spanish, it was disqualified from IF Comp 2001. Olvido Mortal was later re-translated into English, this time by Nick Montfort, who called his translation Dead Reckoning; most English players prefer this translation. In a SPAG 40 interview with Urbatain, the game's original title is translated as Fatal Forgetfulness, though Deadly Oblivion is probably more accurate.
  • The Big Scoop (Johan Berntsson; 2004; Z-code).
    Only the English version was released to the IF Comp 2004, where it placed 13th out of 36 entries. However, its readme file informed players that it was developed in parallel with a Swedish translation titled Pangnyheten, which was released only after the comp results were announced.
  • Mingsheng (Deane Saunders; 2004; Z-code).
    This game is in English, but included some "Chinese character flavour text" in room names, some object descriptions, and on a .pdf map. Fortunately for the English player, neither knowledge of Chinese nor a Z-code interpreter capable of displaying Chinese characters was necessary to play the game. Mingsheng placed 7th out of 36 entries, and was a finalist for Best Setting at XYZZY Awards 2004.
  • Die Vollkommene Masse (Alice Merridew; 2004; TADS 2).
    Despite the title, this game is in English. Also, Alice "Omega" Merridew withdrew her game from the comp because she mistakenly sent the wrong version to the comp organizer. (This entry included in an attempt at completeness.)
  • Raik (Harry Giles; 1-Oct-2014; Twine; Web browser; Scots and English). IF Comp 2014: 15th place.
    This entry tells a dual narrative - one in English, one in Scots - with the player initially able to choose in which language to read the story. The two narratives are markedly different, yet the actions in each map to the other (unseen) narrative. Giles expounded on the use of dual language in Raik in a postmortem on intfiction.org.