Difference between revisions of "Optimal ending"

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For example, a western-themed game might involve three main goals: winning the girl, the gold, and the horses. A player who achieves any one of these goals might be considered to have [[winning|won]], but the optimal ending may require the player to win the girl, the gold, <em>and</em> the horses. The player might be permitted to end the game prematurely, by leaving town without accomplishing any of the goals&mdash;but such an ending would hardly be optimal.
 
For example, a western-themed game might involve three main goals: winning the girl, the gold, and the horses. A player who achieves any one of these goals might be considered to have [[winning|won]], but the optimal ending may require the player to win the girl, the gold, <em>and</em> the horses. The player might be permitted to end the game prematurely, by leaving town without accomplishing any of the goals&mdash;but such an ending would hardly be optimal.
  
 
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[[Category:Glossary]]
Return to [[Glossary]]
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== Discussion ==
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Optimal Ending isn't necessarily synonymous with enjoyment. "A Change in the Weather" and "Little Blue Men" can be "won" quickly, but doing so will deprive the player of their full experiences. --JdBerry - 10 Sep 2002
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Hmm... I agree with your comment, but since the definition doesn't mention "enjoyment" I'm not sure it's necessary. Nevertheless, I have tweaked the text somewhat. -- DGJ - 10 Sep 2002 
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KathyKennedy - 15 Nov 2002 - punctuation
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Latest revision as of 08:51, 1 January 2005

In a game with multiple endings, that ending which yields the highest score (or that otherwise signifies the "best" outcome).

For example, a western-themed game might involve three main goals: winning the girl, the gold, and the horses. A player who achieves any one of these goals might be considered to have won, but the optimal ending may require the player to win the girl, the gold, and the horses. The player might be permitted to end the game prematurely, by leaving town without accomplishing any of the goals—but such an ending would hardly be optimal.