Difference between revisions of "Parser"

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A computer program or portion of a program that analyzes a string of characters in order to recognize grammatical units. Joseph Weizenbaum's [http://www.uwec.edu/jerzdg/orr/articles/IF/canon/Eliza.htm Eliza] (1966) and Terry Winograd's [http://hci.stanford.edu/~winograd/shrdlu/ SHRDLU] (c.1970) are two of the best-known early interactive programs that had parsers.
 
A computer program or portion of a program that analyzes a string of characters in order to recognize grammatical units. Joseph Weizenbaum's [http://www.uwec.edu/jerzdg/orr/articles/IF/canon/Eliza.htm Eliza] (1966) and Terry Winograd's [http://hci.stanford.edu/~winograd/shrdlu/ SHRDLU] (c.1970) are two of the best-known early interactive programs that had parsers.
  
Early IF, including the original <i>Adventure</i>, used a [[two-word parser]] that only looked at the first few characters of each word. More recent IF parsers can understand longer words and more complex commands, but the genre is still a long way from using [[natural language processing]] to achieve complete understanding of all English inputs.
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Early IF, including the original [[Adventure]], used a [[two-word parser]] that only looked at the first few characters of each word. More recent IF parsers, following the lead of [[Zork]], can understand longer words and more complex commands, but the genre is still a long way from using [[natural language processing]] to achieve complete understanding of all English inputs.
  
 
Modern IF [[programming languages]] include a parser as part of the [[authoring system]], removing the need for the [[programmer]] to write a [[homebrew parser]].
 
Modern IF [[programming languages]] include a parser as part of the [[authoring system]], removing the need for the [[programmer]] to write a [[homebrew parser]].

Revision as of 04:28, 10 October 2005

A computer program or portion of a program that analyzes a string of characters in order to recognize grammatical units. Joseph Weizenbaum's Eliza (1966) and Terry Winograd's SHRDLU (c.1970) are two of the best-known early interactive programs that had parsers.

Early IF, including the original Adventure, used a two-word parser that only looked at the first few characters of each word. More recent IF parsers, following the lead of Zork, can understand longer words and more complex commands, but the genre is still a long way from using natural language processing to achieve complete understanding of all English inputs.

Modern IF programming languages include a parser as part of the authoring system, removing the need for the programmer to write a homebrew parser.

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